Learn A Little, Do A Lot


This is a blog pertaining to the environment, environmental effects, things that effect the environment, sustainable energy, endangered species, Earth, green life, etc.

We hope you enjoy and learn from these posts. We also hope you'll use any information and apply it to your life in some way, whether it's by growing a garden or starting a club to make a donation to an environmental group.


*Update (January 2011): Hi all! Due to classes and work, it has been really difficult for me to make original posts, and I apologize for the lack of original posts as well as for how sporadically posts are made.*

If you have post suggestions for us, please send them to the ask box or by a submission (links are listed below in green).

Blog Roll  Literature Worth Taking a Deep Gander Into  Take a Look-See at These Sites  The Visuals: Films and Documentaries  

Is there something you want to see on this blog? Do you have a question for us? Ask here :)

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montanamoment:

The Bison
Learn more about one of Montana’s favorite residents.

montanamoment:

The Bison

Learn more about one of Montana’s favorite residents.

Source: montanamoment

Urgent security update →

dytabytes:

heatherbat:

daveio:

herdivineshadow:

staff:

Bad news. A major vulnerability, known as “Heartbleed,” has been disclosed for the technology that powers encryption across the majority of the internet. That includes Tumblr.

We have no evidence of any breach…

Source: staff

visitthezoo:

caledscratch:

roarkshop:

I watched this 4 minute video about how reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone park literally changed everything about the park and just sat there for another two minutes, mouth open and teary eyed and amazed. Definitely worth a watch. 

it’s amazing how the earth itself changed in response to wildlife…

The POSITIVE impact of a species being reintroduced to its natural habitat to not just its species but others is remarkable! Wolves are amazing!

Source: roarkshop

As y’all know, I work with ACR, a 501c3 cat rescue organization. We are in desperate need of fosters for the cats already in our systems, and for continued pulls off the kill list at Animal Control. 

Please reblog this and ask any friends and family you may have in the area if they are interested in fostering. 

  1. Fostering can be long or short term. If you are fostering cats from within our system, they can always be returned back to us if something doesn’t work out.
  2. Fostering is absolutely a possibility for people who already have pets. We can help you with introductions if you’ve never done it before. 
  3. All medical expenses will be covered by ACR. It would be great if you could pay for food and litter because we do not have extensive funds, but if that’s not a possibility, we can help you out with that as well. 
  4. We work around what you would like in a foster cat. There are dozens of cats in need and more coming in every day. 

I can personally speak to you about fostering if you have any questions; if you think you’re ready to foster, you can fill out the very simple application on our website by clicking “Foster/Adoption Application” on the left-hand side. Feel free to leave me asks (‘queen’ on tumblr) or email me at talenalydia@gmail.com. You can list me, Talena Smith, as how you found out about ACR on the application.

PLEASE REBLOG EVEN IF YOU DON’T LIVE IN THE AREA.

Thank you for your support!

Source: queen

npr:

Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images
Next week Jane Goodall will turn 80; Commentator Barbara King celebrates her accomplishments and urges you to send Goodall a message of thanks and congratulations.

npr:

Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Next week Jane Goodall will turn 80; Commentator Barbara King celebrates her accomplishments and urges you to send Goodall a message of thanks and congratulations.

quietseedling:

guacats:

SeaWorld just got busted by a US government agency for violating the Animal Abuse Act — and we may have a rare chance to end its animal cruelty for good

In a surprise move, a Californian congressmen has just introduced a law to make it illegal to keep orcas in captivity. This could change everything — but SeaWorld is already mounting a vicious campaign to defeat this congressman’s brave move. We need to tell the State of California that the public won’t accept SeaWorld’s imprisonment of orcas any longer.’

Enact the Orca Welfare and Safety Act to make it illegal to hold orcas in captivity for performance or entertainment purposes.

Sign on to stop SeaWorld from imprisoning whales for profit.

HOLY HECK: This is actually SUPER close to meeting the goal!

Come on! Let’s spread it like wildfire!

Source: guacats

creatingmyowndreams:

babblingbug:

(Bunnies and Sunshine)

Easter is coming up! And it’s a terrible time for pet store bunnies!

Rabbits are marketed as “easy”, short-lived, starter pets, especially during the Easter holidays, but that couldn’t be farther from the truth! A healthy, well cared for bunny can live just as long as the average cat or dog- 10-12 years!

What’s more, they have more complex needs than a cat or a dog. Rabbits are prey animals and do not behave or show affection in the same way as predators like cats and dogs; they don’t deal well with being outside-only animals; they can get sad if they’re on their own and don’t receive enough attention; and if they’re bought as a male and female couple, they can start reproducing from as early as 5-6 months of age, and they can carry multiple litters at the same time!

They have a specialised diet (NOT carrots!), need a specialised living area (unless you want all your things to get chewed up!), and they need specialised vets! Caring for them costs as much as caring for a dog!

They’re a big responsibility!

This Easter, Make Yours Chocolate!

Boost this to the end of time

Source: babblingbug

rhamphotheca:

Endangered Tortoises Are Being Defaced on Purpose… to Protect Them

by Sabrina Elfarra

Some of the rarest tortoises in the world are a hot commodity on the black market for their unique golden shells which can sell for tens of thousands of dollars.

In an effort to obstruct poachers, conservationists have made the bold move to carve into the shells of the tortoises, protecting the animals by making their domes less attractive.  The branded shells also make it easier for authorities to trace them if they are stolen.

“Endangered tortoises and turtles are facing a real threat, and we’re hoping that this will be an effective tool to keep them safe,” Eric Goode, the founder and president of the Turtle Conservancy told ABC News today.

Years of hunting have caused near extinction for many tortoise species, so sanctuaries and zoos are using identification marks, including laser inscribing, tattoos and engraving to hinder poachers and discourage collectors from paying a great deal of money for the animals.

Since the conservancy began putting the branded tortoises back into the wild in 2011, the shells have not come up in the black market, which officials believe is a good sign.

The Turtle Conservancy’s Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, Calif., has been working with ploughshare tortoises among others which originate from Madagascar. Their goal is to engrave the shells of both the ploughshares in captivity as well as those living in the wild…

(read more: ABCNews)

photos by The Turtle Conservancy

Source: rhamphotheca

theanimalblog:

Elephant Seals along the central coast of California. | By: Blonde Photography (FB) / Tumblr

theanimalblog:

Elephant Seals along the central coast of California. | By: Blonde Photography (FB) / Tumblr

montereybayaquarium:

Good News for Sea Otter Conservation in Southern California
The Aquarium applauds this week’s decision by a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit by fishing groups wanting to reinstate the controversial “no-otter” zone in waters off southern California.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established the “no-otter” zone in 1987 as part of a larger sea otter translocation program, but the program ended in 2012 after it was deemed a failure. In 2013, fishing groups sued the Fish and Wildlife Service for ending the program. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit on Monday, but the fishing groups have 21 days to amend their lawsuit.
Under the translocation program, the Fish and Wildlife Service hoped to establish a colony of sea otters at San Nicolas Island off Santa Barbara and was required to relocate any sea otters found south of Point Conception. Wildlife officials determined that the “no-otter” zone prohibited sea otters from being able to naturally expand their range into areas and habitats where they had historically been present. Scientists believe such expansion is necessary for recovery of the southern sea otter, a threatened species.
Before they were hunted to the brink of extinction during the fur trade of the 18th and 19th centuries, it is estimated that more than 16,000 southern sea otters inhabited the west coast. Today’s population hovers below 3,000, and extends from just south of Half Moon Bay to south of Point Conception.
Sea otters play a critical role in ocean health, helping keep nearshore ecosystems in balance by eating sea urchins and other invertebrates that graze on giant kelp. If left unchecked, these grazing animals can destroy kelp forests and leave barren zones in their wake. Recent research from Elkhorn Slough has shown that an increased presence of sea otters directly contributes to recovery and expansion of eelgrass beds, which serve as nurseries for numerous species and as important filters of carbon and contaminants in estuary waters.
Learn more about our sea otter conservation efforts

montereybayaquarium:

Good News for Sea Otter Conservation in Southern California

The Aquarium applauds this week’s decision by a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit by fishing groups wanting to reinstate the controversial “no-otter” zone in waters off southern California.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established the “no-otter” zone in 1987 as part of a larger sea otter translocation program, but the program ended in 2012 after it was deemed a failure. In 2013, fishing groups sued the Fish and Wildlife Service for ending the program. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit on Monday, but the fishing groups have 21 days to amend their lawsuit.

Under the translocation program, the Fish and Wildlife Service hoped to establish a colony of sea otters at San Nicolas Island off Santa Barbara and was required to relocate any sea otters found south of Point Conception. Wildlife officials determined that the “no-otter” zone prohibited sea otters from being able to naturally expand their range into areas and habitats where they had historically been present. Scientists believe such expansion is necessary for recovery of the southern sea otter, a threatened species.

Before they were hunted to the brink of extinction during the fur trade of the 18th and 19th centuries, it is estimated that more than 16,000 southern sea otters inhabited the west coast. Today’s population hovers below 3,000, and extends from just south of Half Moon Bay to south of Point Conception.

Sea otters play a critical role in ocean health, helping keep nearshore ecosystems in balance by eating sea urchins and other invertebrates that graze on giant kelp. If left unchecked, these grazing animals can destroy kelp forests and leave barren zones in their wake. Recent research from Elkhorn Slough has shown that an increased presence of sea otters directly contributes to recovery and expansion of eelgrass beds, which serve as nurseries for numerous species and as important filters of carbon and contaminants in estuary waters.

Learn more about our sea otter conservation efforts